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Scientifica
Volume 2012, Article ID 712605, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.6064/2012/712605
Review Article

Formins: Emerging Players in the Dynamic Plant Cell Cortex

Department of Experimental Plant Biology, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Viničná 5, 128 43 Prague, Czech Republic

Received 26 August 2012; Accepted 16 September 2012

Academic Editors: S. Fukushige and H. Schatten

Copyright © 2012 Fatima Cvrčková. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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