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Scientifica
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 152879, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/152879
Review Article

The Molecular Epidemiology of Chronic Aflatoxin Driven Impaired Child Growth

Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742, USA

Received 18 August 2013; Accepted 27 October 2013

Academic Editors: C. Avellini, K. Jung, and W. Vogel

Copyright © 2013 Paul Craig Turner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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