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Scientifica
Volume 2014, Article ID 748750, 21 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/748750
Review Article

The Preventable Risk Integrated ModEl and Its Use to Estimate the Health Impact of Public Health Policy Scenarios

1British Heart Foundation Centre on Population Approaches to Non-Communicable Disease Prevention, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7LF, UK
2DCU School of Computing, Dublin City University, Dublin, Ireland

Received 27 April 2014; Accepted 8 September 2014; Published 25 September 2014

Academic Editor: Giuseppe Mastrangelo

Copyright © 2014 Peter Scarborough et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Citations to this Article [14 citations]

The following is the list of published articles that have cited the current article.

  • Cliona Ni Mhurchu, Helen Eyles, Murat Genc, Peter Scarborough, Mike Rayner, Anja Mizdrak, Kelechi Nnoaham, and Tony Blakely, “Effects of Health-Related Food Taxes and Subsidies on Mortality from Diet-Related Disease in New Zealand: An Econometric-Epidemiologic Modelling Study,” Plos One, vol. 10, no. 7, 2015. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • S Smed, P Scarborough, M Rayner, and J D Jensen, “The effects of the Danish saturated fat tax on food and nutrient intake and modelled health outcomes: an econometric and comparative risk assessment evaluation.,” European journal of clinical nutrition, vol. 70, no. 6, pp. 681–6, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Adam D. M. Briggs, Ariane Kehlbacher, Richard Tiffin, and Peter Scarborough, “Simulating the impact on health of internalising the cost of carbon in food prices combined with a tax on sugar-sweetened beverages,” BMC Public Health, vol. 16, no. 1, 2016. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Elinor Hallström, Quentin Gee, Peter Scarborough, and David A. Cleveland, “A healthier US diet could reduce greenhouse gas emissions from both the food and health care systems,” Climatic Change, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Oliver T. Mytton, Marko Tainio, David Ogilvie, Jenna Panter, Linda Cobiac, and James Woodcock, “The modelled impact of increases in physical activity: the effect of both increased survival and reduced incidence of disease,” European Journal of Epidemiology, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Marko Tainio, Pablo Monsivais, Nicholas Rv Jones, Christian Brand, and James Woodcock, “Mortality, greenhouse gas emissions and consumer cost impacts of combined diet and physical activity scenarios: a health impact assessment study.,” BMJ open, vol. 7, no. 2, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Laura Alston, Karen Louise Peterson, Jane P Jacobs, Steven Allender, and Melanie Nichols, “Quantifying the role of modifiable risk factors in the differences in cardiovascular disease mortality rates between metropolitan and rural populations in Australia: a macrosimulation modelling study.,” BMJ open, vol. 7, no. 11, 2017. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Francisco Goiana-da-Silva, David Cruz-e-Silva, Luke Allen, Maria João Gregório, Milton Severo, Paulo Jorge Nogueira, Alexandre Morais Nunes, Pedro Graça, Carla Lopes, Marisa Miraldo, João Breda, Kremlin Wickramasinghe, Ara Darzi, Fernando Araújo, and Bente Mikkelsen, “Modelling impacts of food industry co-regulation on noncommunicable disease mortality, Portugal,” Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 97, no. 7, pp. 450–459, 2018. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Laura Alston, Jane Jacobs, Steven Allender, and Melanie Nichols, “A comparison of the modelled impacts on CVD mortality if attainment of public health recommendations was achieved in metropolitan and rural Australia,” Public Health Nutrition, pp. 1–9, 2019. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Adam D. M. Briggs, Linda J. Cobiac, Jane Wolstenholme, and Peter Scarborough, “PRIMEtime CE: a multistate life table model for estimating the cost-effectiveness of interventions affecting diet and physical activity,” BMC Health Services Research, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Adam D. M. Briggs, Jane Wolstenholme, and Peter Scarborough, “Estimating the cost-effectiveness of salt reformulation and increasing access to leisure centres in England, with PRIMEtime CE model validation using the AdViSHE tool,” BMC Health Services Research, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Sanjib Saha, Jonas Nordström, Irene Mattisson, Peter M. Nilsson, and Ulf-G Gerdtham, “Modelling the Effect of Compliance with Nordic Nutrition Recommendations on Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer Mortality in the Nordic Countries,” Nutrients, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 1434, 2019. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Ben Amies-Cull, Adam D M Briggs, and Peter Scarborough, “Estimating the potential impact of the UK government’s sugar reduction programme on child and adult health: modelling study,” Bmj, pp. l1417, 2019. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  • Sanjib Saha, Jonas Nordstrom, Ulf-G Gerdtham, Irene Mattisson, Peter Nilsson, and Peter Scarborough, “Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer Mortality by Achieving Healthy Dietary Goals for the Swedish Population: A Macro-Simulation Modelling Study,” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, vol. 16, no. 5, pp. 890, 2019. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar