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Scientifica
Volume 2016, Article ID 1297603, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/1297603
Research Article

Numerical Response of Migratory Shorebirds to Prey Distribution in a Large Temperate Arid Wetland, China

1School of Nature Conservation, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing 100083, China
2Science Division, Office of Environment and Heritage, Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia

Received 6 August 2016; Revised 25 October 2016; Accepted 16 November 2016

Academic Editor: Dong Xie

Copyright © 2016 Yamian Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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