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Scientifica
Volume 2016, Article ID 3769690, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/3769690
Review Article

Research Trends in Emerging Contaminants on the Aquatic Environments of Tanzania

1Chemistry Department, School of Physical Sciences, College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, University of Dodoma, P.O. Box 338, Dodoma, Tanzania
2Chemistry Department, College of Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
3Mathematics Department, College of Natural and Applied Sciences, University of Dar es Salaam, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

Received 11 December 2015; Revised 21 January 2016; Accepted 24 January 2016

Academic Editor: Kyungho Choi

Copyright © 2016 H. Miraji et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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