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Scientifica
Volume 2016, Article ID 5619358, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5619358
Research Article

Frequency and Significance of Abnormal Pancreatic Imaging in Patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genetic Mutations

1Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
3Division of Hematology and Oncology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
4Department of Radiology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA
5Department of General Surgery, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA

Received 3 December 2015; Accepted 23 February 2016

Academic Editor: Cosimo Sperti

Copyright © 2016 Elie Chahla et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objective. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is typically diagnosed in advanced stages resulting in a significant reduction in the number of patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Although the majority of cases are believed to occur sporadically, about 10% show familial clustering and studies have identified an increased frequency of BRCA germline mutations. The role of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in these populations is unclear. Our study aims to identify the abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods. A retrospective review of patient medical records with known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was conducted. Data was collected and all available abdominal imaging studies were reviewed. Results. A total of 66 patients were identified, 36 with BRCA1 and 30 with BRCA2 mutations. Only 20/66 (30%) had abdominal imaging (14 BRCA1 and 6 BRCA2 patients). Of those patients with abdominal imaging, abnormal pancreatic imaging findings were detected in 7/20 (35%) cases. Conclusion. Our study shows a high incidence of abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in patients with BRCA genetic mutations (35%). Larger studies are needed to further define the role of pancreatic cancer screening and the significance of abnormal imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.