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Scientifica
Volume 2016, Article ID 8927654, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/8927654
Review Article

Evidence for the Paleoethnobotany of the Neanderthal: A Review of the Literature

1Indigenous Studies Department, University of Kansas, Lippincott Hall, 1410 Jayhawk Boulevard, Lawrence, KS 66045, USA
2Kansas Biological Survey, University of Kansas, 2101 Constant Ave., Lawrence, KS 66047, USA

Received 9 January 2016; Accepted 29 September 2016

Academic Editor: Anthony Sebastian

Copyright © 2016 Gerhard P. Shipley and Kelly Kindscher. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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