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Scientifica
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 1730130, 13 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/1730130
Research Article

Winter Waterbird Community Composition and Use at Created Wetlands in West Virginia, USA

1School of Natural Resources, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6125, Morgantown, WV 26505, USA
2West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 99, Farmington, WV 26571, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Hannah L. Clipp; moc.liamg@ppilc.hannah

Received 9 November 2016; Revised 14 February 2017; Accepted 19 February 2017; Published 12 March 2017

Academic Editor: Dong Xie

Copyright © 2017 Hannah L. Clipp et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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