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Scientifica
Volume 2017, Article ID 2745764, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/2745764
Research Article

Methods to Reduce Forest Residue Volume after Timber Harvesting and Produce Black Carbon

1USDA FS, Rocky Mountain Research Station, 1221 S. Main, Moscow, ID 83843, USA
2USDA FS, Pacific Southwest Research Station, 1731 Research Park Dr., Davis, CA 95618, USA
3USDA FS, Umatilla National Forest, 72510 Coyote Rd, Pendleton, CA 97801, USA
4Utah State University, 5230 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84332, USA
5Nevada Division of Forestry, 2478 Fairview Drive, Carson City, NV 89701, USA

Correspondence should be addressed to Deborah S. Page-Dumroese; su.def.sf@eseormudd

Received 16 December 2016; Accepted 21 February 2017; Published 9 March 2017

Academic Editor: Artemi Cerda

Copyright © 2017 Deborah S. Page-Dumroese et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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