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Scientifica
Volume 2017, Article ID 7853491, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7853491
Research Article

The Effect of Artificial Mowing on the Competition of Phragmites australis and Spartina alterniflora in the Yangtze Estuary

Yue Yuan,1 Chao Zhang,2,3 and Dezhi Li4,5,6

1Research Institute of Forestry Policy and Information, Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing 100091, China
2Key Laboratory of Geographic Information Science, Ministry of Education, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200241, China
3State Key Laboratory of Estuarine and Coastal Research, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062, China
4Department of Environmental Science, East China Normal University, 500 N. Dongchuan Rd, Shanghai 200241, China
5Shanghai Key Laboratory of Urbanization and Ecological Restoration, Shanghai, China
6National Field Observation and Research Station in the Tiantong Forest Ecosystem of Zhejiang, Ningbo, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Dezhi Li; nc.ude.unce.sed@ilzd

Received 20 October 2016; Revised 20 December 2016; Accepted 16 January 2017; Published 28 February 2017

Academic Editor: Roger P. Mormul

Copyright © 2017 Yue Yuan et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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