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Security and Communication Networks
Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9534754, 17 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/9534754
Research Article

A New Approach for Delivering Customized Security Everywhere: Security Service Chain

Information Science Technology Institute, Zhengzhou, Henan 450000, China

Correspondence should be addressed to Yi Liu; moc.621@2859iyuil

Received 28 July 2017; Revised 22 October 2017; Accepted 8 November 2017; Published 12 December 2017

Academic Editor: Guangjie Han

Copyright © 2017 Yi Liu et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Security functions are usually deployed on proprietary hardware, which makes the delivery of security service inflexible and of high cost. Emerging technologies such as software-defined networking and network function virtualization go in the direction of executing functions as software components in virtual machines or containers provisioned in standard hardware resources. They enable network to provide customized security service by deploying Security Service Chain (SSC), which refers to steering flow through multiple security functions in a particular order specified by individual user or application. However, SSC Deployment Problem (SSC-DP) needs to be solved. It is a challenging problem for various reasons, such as the heterogeneity of instances in terms of service capacity and resource demand. In this paper, we propose an SSC-based approach to deliver security service to users without worrying about physical locations of security functions. For SSC-DP, we present a three-phase method to solve it while optimizing network and security resource allocation. The presented method allows network to serve a large number of flows and minimizes the latency seen by flows. Comparative experiments on the fat-tree and Waxman topologies show that our method performs better than other heuristics under a wide range of network conditions.