Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Sleep Disorders
Volume 2015, Article ID 747906, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/747906
Research Article

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Time to Procurement in a Disadvantaged Population

1Department of Neurology, Louisiana State University School of Medicine, Shreveport, LA 71103, USA
2Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
3Emory Sleep Center, Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA

Received 24 February 2015; Revised 20 May 2015; Accepted 24 May 2015

Academic Editor: Giora Pillar

Copyright © 2015 Lourdes M. DelRosso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Introduction. The management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients who cannot afford a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device is challenging. In this study we compare time to CPAP procurement in three groups of patients diagnosed with OSA: uninsured subsidized by a humanitarian grant (Group 1), uninsured unsubsidized (Group 2), and those with Medicare or Medicaid (Group 3). We evaluate follow-up and adherence in Group 1. We hypothesize that additional factors, rather than just the ability to obtain CPAP, may uniquely affect follow-up and adherence in uninsured patients. Methods. 30 patients were in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. 12 patients were in Group 3. Time of CPAP procurement from OSA diagnosis to CPAP initiation was assessed in all groups. CPAP adherence data was collected for Group 1 patients at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Results. There were no significant differences between groups in gender, age, body mass index, or apnea hypopnea index. The mean time to procurement in Group 1 was shorter compared to Group 2 but not significant. Compared to both Group 1 and Group 2, Group 3 patients had significantly shorter times to device procurement. Conclusion. Time to procurement of CPAP was significantly shorter in those with Medicaid/Medicare insurance compared to the uninsured.