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Surgery Research and Practice
Volume 2014, Article ID 871325, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/871325
Clinical Study

Pre- and Postoperative Vomiting in Children Undergoing Video-Assisted Gastrostomy Tube Placement

1Department of Paediatric Surgery, Skåne University Hospital, 221 85 Lund, Sweden
2The Institution of Clinical Research, Lund University, 221 85 Lund, Sweden

Received 16 April 2014; Revised 12 July 2014; Accepted 4 August 2014; Published 12 August 2014

Academic Editor: Michael Hünerbein

Copyright © 2014 Torbjörn Backman et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of pre- and postoperative vomiting in children undergoing a Video-Assisted Gastrostomy (VAG) operation. Patients and Methods. 180 children underwent a VAG operation and were subdivided into groups based on their underlying diagnosis. An anamnesis with respect to vomiting was taken from each of the children’s parents before the operation. After the VAG operation, all patients were followed prospectively at one and six months after surgery. All complications including vomiting were documented according to a standardized protocol. Results. Vomiting occurred preoperatively in 51 children (28%). One month after surgery the incidence was 43 (24%) in the same group of children and six months after it was found in 40 (22%). There was a difference in vomiting frequency both pre- and postoperatively between the children in the groups with different diagnoses included in the study. No difference was noted in pre- and postoperative vomiting frequency within each specific diagnosis group. Conclusion. The preoperative vomiting symptoms persisted after the VAG operation. Neurologically impaired children had a higher incidence of vomiting than patients with other diagnoses, a well-known fact, probably due to their underlying diagnosis and not the VAG operation. This information is useful in preoperative counselling.