Stroke Research and Treatment
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Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication32 days
CiteScore3.400
Impact Factor-

Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis in Women: Subgroup Analysis of the VENOST Study

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Stroke Research and Treatment provides a platform for clinicians and basic scientists interested in cerebral circulation and associated diseases. Journal topics include risk factors, symptomatology, imaging, pathophysiology etc.

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Research Article

Validity and Reliability of the Thai Version of the Gait Assessment and Intervention Tool (G.A.I.T.)

Introduction. The Gait Assessment and Intervention Tool (G.A.I.T.) is well-accepted for determining changes in gait quality in neurological patients. This study is aimed at translating the G.A.I.T. to Thai and to examine its validity and reliability. Methods. The Thai translation and back-translation into English were done according to international guidelines. Sixty-eight patients with subacute to chronic stroke were recruited. Concurrent validity was determined by the correlation coefficient between the Thai G.A.I.T. scale and a comfortable vs. fast gait speed. The convergent validity was determined by the correlation coefficient between the Thai G.A.I.T. and the lower extremity Motricity Index, the Functional Ambulation Category (FAC), and the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). Interrater reliability was assessed using videos of 68 patients analysed by two independent raters. Each rater was randomly assigned to rescore the Thai G.A.I.T. for each patient over at least two weeks to assess intrarater reliability. Results. The concurrent validity of the Thai G.A.I.T. vs. the respective comfortable and fast gait speeds was excellent ( and , ). The respective convergent validity with the lower extremity Motricity Index, NIHSS, and FAC was , 0.57, and -0.51, respectively. The respective inter- and intrarater reliabilities were excellent (, 95% CI 0.88-0.96 and 0.95, 95% CI 0.91-0.97). Conclusion. A Thai version of the G.A.I.T. was developed, and its validity and reliability for use among patients with subacute to chronic stroke were established. Further work regarding the responsiveness of the tool is needed.

Research Article

Assessing the Use of Standardized Outcome Measures for Stroke Rehabilitation among Physiotherapists in Ghana

Background. The use of standardized outcome measures is an aspect of good clinical practice and essential to the rehabilitation of patients suffering from stroke. Literature reports regarding the extent of usage of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation by physiotherapists globally are inconsistent. In addition, the patronage of outcome measures in stroke rehabilitation in low-resourced countries is uncertain. Objective. This study was conducted to assess the current practice of physiotherapists in Ghana regarding the use of standardized outcome measures in the rehabilitation of stroke patients. Method. A descriptive cross-sectional survey, was used involving 105 registered physiotherapists in Ghana. A 35-item adapted questionnaire was used to collect data on some commonly used outcome measures and frequency of use by physiotherapists for stroke patients. Results. A total of 55 (52.4%) physiotherapists did not use outcome measures in their clinical practice. Physiotherapists below 40 years of age use outcome measures (64.7%) more than those 41 years and above (6.7%). Physiotherapists working in public facilities in Ghana are more likely to use outcome measures (56.2%) than those in private facilities (16.2%). Physiotherapists who attend to 1-10 patients in a week used outcome measures more (32.4%) than physiotherapists who attend to more than 30 patients (3.8%) in a week. Conclusion. There is poor usage of outcome measures by Ghanaian physiotherapists, with more than half of the participants not using any standardized outcome measures for rehabilitation of patients in their practice. Physiotherapists who attends to fewer number of patients in a week are more likely to use outcome measures. There is the need for implementation of policy and guidelines on the use of outcome measures by the Allied Health Professions Council and the Ghana Physiotherapy Association.

Research Article

Minimally Invasive Parafascicular Surgery (MIPS) for Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage Compared to Medical Management: A Case Series Comparison for a Single Institution

Objective. We compared the safety and effectiveness of minimally invasive parafascicular surgery (MIPS) as a frontline treatment for spontaneous supratentorial ICH to medical management. Patients. The sample consisted of 17 patients who underwent MIPS from January 2014 to December 2016 and a comparison group of 23 patients who were medically managed from June 2012 to December 2013. All had an International Classification of Disease (ICD) diagnosis of 431 and were treated at Grady Memorial Hospital, an urban, public, safety-net hospital. Methods. The primary endpoint was risk of inpatient mortality. Secondary endpoints were rates of inpatient infection and favorable discharge status, defined as discharge to home or rehabilitation facility. Demographics and pre- and postclinical outcomes were compared using -tests, the Mann–Whitney test, and chi-squared tests for continuous, ordinal and categorical measures, respectively. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate the time to inpatient death. Logistic regression analyses were used to determine treatment effects on secondary outcomes. We also conducted exploratory subgroup analyses which compared MIPS to two medical management subgroups: those who had surgery during their hospitalization and those that did not. Results. Two patients (12%) died in the MIPS group compared to three (12%) in the medical management group. MIPS did not increase the risk of inpatient mortality relative to medical management. Rates of inpatient infection did not differ significantly between the two groups; eight MIPS patients (47%) and 13 medically managed patients (50%) contracted infections. MIPS significantly increased the likelihood of favorable discharge status (odds ratio (OR) 1.77; 95% CI, 1.12–21.9) compared to medical management. No outcome measures were significantly different between MIPS and the medical management subgroup without surgery, while rates of favorable discharge were higher among the MIPS patients compared to the medical management group with surgery. Conclusions. These data suggest that MIPS, as a frontline treatment for spontaneous ICH, versus medical management for spontaneous ICH warrants further investigation.

Review Article

Frequency and Mortality Risk Factors of Acute Ischemic Stroke in Emergency Department in Burkina Faso

Objective. To determine the prevalence of ischemic stroke deaths and their predictive factors in the Emergency Department at Yalgado Ouedraogo University Teaching Hospital (YOUTH). Methodology. This was a retrospective study with an analytical and descriptive focus over a period of three years from January 1, 2015, to December 31, 2017. Results. During the study period, 302 acute ischemic stroke patients with a mean age of years were included. Atrial hypertension was the most common vascular risk factor in 52.5%. On admission, 34.8% of patients had loss of consciousness. The mean time to perform brain CT was 1.5 days. The average length of stay was 4 days. Electrocardiogram, echocardiography, and cervical Doppler were not performed during hospitalization in ED. The mortality rate was 39%, respectively, 37.6% in male and 41.6% in female. The mean age of patients who died in ED was years. Hypertension was the most common vascular risk factors in 54.2% of death. After logistic regression, the predictors of death were past history of heart disease, consciousness disorders, hyperthermia, hyperglycemia on admission, poststroke pneumonia, and urinary tract infection. Conclusions. Acute ischemic stroke was frequent in Emergency Department with high mortality rate. The mortality risk factors were the same than those found in literature. This higher mortality can be avoided by early diagnosis and an adequate management.

Research Article

Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Predictors of Disability in a Cohort of Jordanian Patients with the First Ischemic Stroke

Objective. To identify the risk factors, etiologies, length of stay, severity, and predictors of disability among patients with the first ischemic stroke in Jordan. Methods. A retrospective cohort study of 142 patients who were admitted to the Neurology Department at King Abdullah University Hospital between July/2017 and March/2018 with a first ischemic stroke. Etiology was classified according to the TOAST criteria. Severity was represented by NIHSS score, disability by mRS score, and prolonged length of stay as hospitalizations more than 75th percentile of the cohort’s median length of stay. Analysis of the sample demographics and descriptive statistics were done, including frequencies of prevalence of independent variables (risk factors) and frequencies of stroke and etiology work-up. Chi-square and univariate analysis of variance “ANOVA” were used to investigate the relationship between risk factors and type of stroke. Finally, logistic regression analysis was used to measure the contribution of each of the independent variables. IRB approval was obtained as necessary. Results. The mean age for the cohort was 66.5 years. The most common risk factors were hypertension (78.8%), diabetes mellitus (60.5%), and ischemic heart disease (29.4%). The most common stroke etiology was small-vessel occlusion (54.2%). Median length of stay was 4 days. Prolonged length of stay was observed in 23.23% of patients, which was associated with several factors, the most common of which were persistent dysphagia (57.5%), nosocomial infection (39.3%), and combined dysphagia and nosocomial infection (21.2%). The mean admission NIHSS score was 7.94, and on discharge was 5.76. In-hospital mortality was 2.81%, while 50% of patients had a favorable outcome on discharge (mRS score between 0-2). The mean discharge mRS score for the cohort was 2.47 (). Large artery atherosclerosis was associated with the highest residual disability with a mean score of 3.67 (), while the stroke of undetermined etiology was associated with the lowest residual disability with a mean score of 1.60 (). Significant predictors of mRS score were smoking ( 3.24, ), age ( 1.98, ), and NIHSS score ( 9.979, 0.000). Conclusion. Ischemic strokes have different etiologies that are associated with different levels of impact on the patient’s clinical status and prognosis. Large artery atherosclerosis was associated with the highest residual disability. Regarding predictors of prognosis, current smoking status, age above 50, gender, and NIHSS on admission appear to be the strongest predictors of prognosis. Finally, higher NIHSS score on admission resulted in a longer hospital stay.

Clinical Study

Predictors of Neurological and Functional Recovery in Patients with Moderate to Severe Ischemic Stroke: The EPICA Study

Background. Improving our knowledge about the impact of restorative therapies employed in the rehabilitation of a stroke patient may help guide practitioners in prescribing treatment regimen that may lead to better post-stroke recovery and quality of life. Aims. To evaluate the neurological and functional recovery for 3 months after an acute ischemic stroke occurred within previous 3 months. To determine predictors of recovery. Design. Prospective observational registry. Population. Patients having suffered acute moderate to severe ischemic stroke of moderate to severe intensity within the previous 3 months with National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score from 10 to 20, 24 hours after arrival at emergency room (ER). Methods. All prespecified variables (sociodemographic and clinical data, lifestyle recommendations, rehabilitation prescription, and neurological assessments) were assessed at three visits, i.e., baseline (D0), one month (M1), and three months (M3). Results. Out of 143 recruited patients, 131 could be analysed at study entry within 3 months after stroke onset with a mean acute NIHSS score of 14.05, decreased to 10.8 at study baseline. Study sample was aged , with 49.2% of women. Neurorehabilitation treatment was applied to 9 of 10 patients from the acute phase and for three months with different intensities depending on the centre. A large proportion of patients recovered from severe dependency on activities of daily living (ADL) at D0 to a mild or moderate disability requiring some help at M3: mean ; ; ; all . Multivariate analyses integrating other regression variables showed a trend in favour of rehabilitation and revascularization therapies on recovery although did not reach statistical significance and that the positive predictors of recovery improvement were baseline BI score, time to treatment, and dietary supplement MLC901 (NurAiD™II). A larger percentage of patients with more severe stroke () who received MLC901 showed above median improvements on mRS compared to control group at M1 (71.4% vs. 29.4%; ) and M3 (85.7% vs. 50%; ). Older subjects and women tend to have less improvement by M3. Conclusions. Our study in patients with moderate to severe stroke shows overall recovery on neurological and functional assessments during the 3 months of study observation. Apart from demonstrating traditional “non-modifiable” predictors of outcome after stroke, like age, sex, and stroke severity, we also detected association between the use of dietary supplement MLC901 and recovery.

Stroke Research and Treatment
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision93 days
Acceptance to publication32 days
CiteScore3.400
Impact Factor-
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