Stroke Research and Treatment
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Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision104 days
Acceptance to publication16 days
CiteScore6.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.610
Impact Factor-

Risk Factors for Hemorrhagic Stroke among Adults in the Democratic Republic of the Congo: A Hospital-Based Study in a Limited Resource Setting

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Stroke Research and Treatment provides a platform for clinicians and basic scientists interested in cerebral circulation and associated diseases. Journal topics include risk factors, symptomatology, imaging, pathophysiology etc.

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Stroke Research and Treatment maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

Technology-Dependent Rehabilitation Involving Action Observation and Movement Imagery for Adults with Stroke: Can It Work? Feasibility of Self-Led Therapy for Upper Limb Rehabilitation after Stroke

Background. Motor (re)learning via technology-dependent therapy has the potential to complement traditional therapies available to older adults living with stroke after hospital discharge and increase therapy dose. To date, little is known about the feasibility of technology-dependent therapy in a home setting for this population. Objective. To develop a technology-dependent therapy that provides mental and physical training for older adults with stroke and assess feasibility. Specifically we ask, “Can it work”? Design. Single group repeated measures. Methods. 13 participants, aged 18 years and over, were recruited over a six-month period. All participants had mild upper limb impairment following a stoke and were no longer receiving intensive rehabilitation. All participants received 18 days of technology-dependent therapy in their own home. Information was gathered on recruitment and retention, usability, and suitability of outcome measures. Results. 11 participants completed the study. The recruitment rate (number recruited/number canvassed; 10.7%) suggests 1907 participants would need to be canvassed to recruit the necessary sample size () for a definitive trial designed to provide 90% power at 5% level of significance to detect a clinically meaningful difference of 5.7 points on the Action Research Arm Test. The usability of the application was rated as exceptional on the System Usability Scale. Effectiveness cannot be determined from this study; however, there was a trend for improvement in measures of upper limb function and emotional well-being. Limitations. The study was limited by a relatively small sample size and lack of control group. Conclusions. This study demonstrated proof of concept of a technology-dependent therapy for upper limb rehabilitation following stroke. The data suggest a definitive trial is feasible, additional strategies to improve recruitment should be considered. Outcome measures aligned with the residual motor function of participants are required.

Research Article

Clinical Risk Score for Predicting Vascular Dementia after Ischemic Stroke in Thailand

Background. Poststroke dementia is an important consequence of stroke and warrants early prevention, detection, and management. The objective of the study was to develop a simple clinical risk score for predicting risk of vascular dementia in patients with ischemic stroke. Methods. The design was a prospective cohort study with 177 ischemic stroke survivors. A standard stroke evaluation was performed at admission, and dementia evaluation was conducted at six months after stroke. The significant predictors were used to develop a risk score using a multivariable logistic regression model. Results. Six months after stroke, 27.1% of the patients were diagnosed with vascular dementia. Five predictors were used in the risk score: age, education, history of stroke, white matter hyperintensities, and stroke subtype. The risk score had an area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AuROC) of 0.76, 72.9% sensitivity, and 79.1% specificity in predicting risk of vascular dementia. The predicted probability of vascular dementia for each risk score point was also reported. Conclusion. The clinical risk score had an acceptable accuracy in predicting vascular dementia in ischemic stroke survivors. It can be used for identifying those who are at a high risk of developing vascular dementia.

Research Article

CTA Study of Ruptured Aneurysms of the Posterior Communicating Artery

Background. Only a few reported studies have used computed tomography angiography (CTA) to image ruptured aneurysms at the junction of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and posterior communicating artery (PcomA) in the context of the adjacent arteries. Therefore, we performed such a study using a GE Workstation. Methods. The parameters of each aneurysm and its adjacent arteries were measured. Then, statistical assessments were performed to compare the parameters of the aneurysm side and the lesion-free (control) side. Results. Sixty-three patients were included in this study. The average age was years, and the ratio of males to females was 0.8 : 1. The measurement results showed that the mean aneurysmal height was  mm, the mean width was mm, and the mean neck width was mm. On the aneurysm side, the intradural ICA diameter was  mm, and the diameter of the ICA at its termination was mm. A fetal-type PcomA was found in 52.4% of aneurysms. The other measured parameters were also provided. Statistical results showed that the height of the aneurysm was larger than the width (). The intradural ICA diameter, the ICA diameter at termination, the intradural ICA length, and the angle between the ICA and PcomA were larger in the aneurysm group than in the control group (). Conclusions. This CTA study showed that the ruptured PcomA aneurysm was often wide-necked, nonspherical, and approximately 5 mm in size. In the presence of a ruptured PcomA aneurysm, the affected intradural ICA became thicker and longer than the contralateral control ICA, and the aneurysm significantly reduced the angle between the ICA and the PcomA.

Research Article

The Effects of Vestibular Rehabilitation on Poststroke Fatigue: A Randomized Controlled Trial Study

Background. A major complication caused by stroke is poststroke fatigue (PSF), and by causing limitations in doing activities of daily living (ADL), it can lower the quality of life. Objective. The present study is an attempt to examine the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on BADL (Basic Activities of Daily Living), fatigue, depression, and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) in patients with stroke. Method. Patients with a history of stroke took part voluntarily in a single-blind clinical trial. The participants were allocated to control and experimental groups randomly. The experimental group attended 24 sessions of vestibular rehabilitation protocol, while the control group received the standard rehabilitation (including three sessions per week each for around 60 min). To measure fatigue, the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) and the Fatigue Assessment Scale (FAS) were used. Depression, BADL, and IADL were measured using the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Barthel Index (BI), and Lawton Instrumental Activities of Daily Living, respectively. All changes were measured from the baseline after the intervention. Results. Significant improvement was found in the experimental group compared to the control group () in FIS (physical, cognition, and social subscales), FAS, BDI-II, BADL, and IADL. Moreover, the results showed small to medium and large effect sizes for the physical subscale of FIS and FAS scores based on Cohen’s , respectively; however, no significant difference was found in terms of cognition and social subscales of FIS, BDI-II, BADL, and IADL scores. Conclusion. It is possible to improve fatigue, depression, and independence in BADL and IADL using vestibular rehabilitation. Thus, it is an effective intervention in case of stroke, which is also well tolerated.

Research Article

Deceptive Adherence to Anticoagulation in Secondary Stroke Prevention

Background. Oral anticoagulants (OAC) effectively reduce the risk for ischemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to assess OAC treatment adherence in secondary stroke prevention and to find predictors of adherence using individualized patient data. Methods. This retrospective cohort study included patients with a discharge diagnosis of ischemic stroke and AF from Tartu University Hospital from 2017 to 2018. Data from patient charts and the Electronic Hospital Information, Estonian Electronic Prescription, and Estonian Electronic Health Record systems were registered. Results. Of the 353 patients, 237 (67%) were prescribed OAC treatment at discharge and during the first year after stroke, 202 (85%) of them used OAC treatment. The mean adherence was 81%, while only 68% had good adherence. Reduced non-vitamin K antagonist OAC (NOAC) dose was used in 68 patients (39%), which was justified in 23 (34%). First-ever stroke occurrence was the only significant factor for good treatment adherence in logistic regression analysis. There were 47 patients (23%) with complications among the patients on OAC treatment. Majority of the patients (70%) with hemorrhagic complications and 52% of patients with thromboembolic complications had good treatment adherence Conclusions. Our study showed that OAC treatment adherence following stroke was modest and first-ever stroke was the only predictor of good or full treatment adherence.

Review Article

Magnitude and Predictors of In-Hospital Stroke Mortality in Ethiopia: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Introduction. Stroke is the second leading cause of mortality worldwide, accounting for approximately 5.5 million deaths each year. Due to demographic and health changes, the epidemiology of stroke is shifting from industrialized to low- and middle-income nations. Ethiopia is a developing country with a population that reflects this shift. Therefore, this systematic review and meta-analysis are aimed at evaluating the extent of in-hospital mortality of both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke in Ethiopia and determining relevant factors associated with the mortality. Methods. Observational studies published as of July 15, 2020, that reported the magnitude, predictors, and causes of in-hospital mortality of stroke were systematically and comprehensively retrieved using the PRISMA 2020 criteria from databases such as PubMed/MEDLINE, Science Direct, and Google Scholar. The review papers were chosen based on the study methodology (facility-based observational), the study area (Ethiopia), the study population (adult patients with stroke), the outcome (in-hospital mortality), and the fact that they were published in English. Result. A total of 3709 patients with stroke were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis, which included 19 publications. In-hospital mortality was 14.03 percent on average in the studies, with reports ranging from 6.04 percent to 37.37 percent. Patients with hemorrhagic type stroke, admission Glasgow Coma Scale less than or equal to 12, impaired mental status, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale stroke level greater than 13, prolonged hospital stay, any incontinence, pneumonia, and/or swallowing trouble had an increased risk of death after stroke. Conclusion. The magnitude of in-hospital mortality of patients with stroke in Ethiopia is high. The assessment of the level of consciousness is vital for clinical management and as an indicator of prognosis. Patients with unfavorable prognostic signs, such as entry Glasgow Coma Scale, National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale , hemorrhagic stroke, pneumonia, incontinence, and dysphagia, should be given priority.

Stroke Research and Treatment
 Journal metrics
See full report
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision104 days
Acceptance to publication16 days
CiteScore6.000
Journal Citation Indicator0.610
Impact Factor-
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Article of the Year Award: Outstanding research contributions of 2021, as selected by our Chief Editors. Read the winning articles.