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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 470648, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/470648
Clinical Study

Mood and Balance are Associated with Free-Living Physical Activity of People after Stroke Residing in the community

1Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW 1825, Australia
2College of Applied Medical Sciences, University of Dammam, Dammam 31451, Saudi Arabia
3Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Human Sciences, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia

Received 9 May 2011; Revised 13 July 2011; Accepted 14 July 2011

Academic Editor: Gillian Mead

Copyright © 2012 Matar A. Alzahrani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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