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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 820673, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/820673
Review Article

How Physically Active Are People with Stroke in Physiotherapy Sessions Aimed at Improving Motor Function? A Systematic Review

1School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia
2International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, P.O. Box 2471, Adelaide, SA 5001, Australia

Received 7 October 2011; Revised 19 December 2011; Accepted 12 January 2012

Academic Editor: Ching-yi Wu

Copyright © 2012 Gurpreet Kaur et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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