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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2012, Article ID 863978, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/863978
Research Article

Poststroke Fatigue: Who Is at Risk for an Increase in Fatigue?

1Clinical Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Utrecht University, 3508 TC, Utrecht, The Netherlands
2Rudolf Magnus Institute of Neuroscience and Center of Excellence for Rehabilitation Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht and Rehabilitation Center De Hoogstraat, Rembrandtkade 10, 3582 TM Utrecht, The Netherlands
3Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Research Institute MOVE, VU University Medical Centre, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Received 14 June 2011; Revised 22 July 2011; Accepted 15 August 2011

Academic Editor: Gillian Mead

Copyright © 2012 Hanna Maria van Eijsden et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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