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Stroke Research and Treatment
Volume 2019, Article ID 3083248, 8 pages
https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/3083248
Research Article

Differences between the Influence of Observing One’s Own Movements and Those of Others in Patients with Stroke

1Department of Neurorehabilitation, Graduate School of Health Sciences, Kio University, Nara 635-0832, Japan
2Department of Rehabilitation, Kishiwada Rehabilitation Hospital, Kishiwada 596-0827, Japan

Correspondence should be addressed to Takeshi Fuchigami; pj.oc.oohay@tenimagihcuf

Received 5 March 2019; Revised 15 May 2019; Accepted 27 May 2019; Published 1 July 2019

Academic Editor: Augusto Fusco

Copyright © 2019 Takeshi Fuchigami and Shu Morioka. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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