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Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations
Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 192601, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2015/192601
Research Article

Delayed Station Blackout Event and Nuclear Safety

Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Received 15 January 2015; Accepted 4 March 2015

Academic Editor: Francesco Di Maio

Copyright © 2015 Andrija Volkanovski and Andrej Prošek. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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