Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision75 days
Acceptance to publication48 days
CiteScore0.810
Impact Factor1.082
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Radiological Safety Analysis for a Hypothetical Accident of a Generic VVER-1000 Nuclear Power Plant

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 Journal profile

Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations publishes research on issues related to the nuclear industry, particularly the installations of nuclear technology, and aims to promote development in the area of nuclear sciences and technologies.

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Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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We currently have a number of Special Issues open for submission. Special Issues highlight emerging areas of research within a field, or provide a venue for a deeper investigation into an existing research area.

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Research Article

Solidification and Stabilization of Spent TBP/OK Organic Liquids in a Phosphate Acid-Based Geopolymer

A method for solidifying spent tributyl phosphate and kerosene (TBP/OK) organic liquids in a phosphate acid-based geopolymer (PAG) was investigated. The TBP/OK emulsion containing tween 80 (T80), TBP/OK organic liquids, and H3PO4 was prepared. The TBP/OK emulsion was mixed with metakaolin to obtain solidified TBP/OK forms (SPT). The compressive strength of the SPT was up to 59.19 MPa when the content of TBP/OK was 18%. The loss of compressive strength of SPT was less than 10% after immersion and less than 25% after freeze-thaw treatment. The final setting time was 40.0 h, and the shrinkage of SPT was nearly 3%. The leaching test indicated that the release of TBP/OK from hardened SPT was limited. Characterization of SPT suggested that solidification of TBP/OK using PAG occurred by physical encapsulation.

Research Article

Numerical Investigation of Fluid Forces Acting on a Confined Cylinder with Obstacle Subjected to Axial Flow

This paper focuses on fluid forces acting on a confined cylinder subjected to axial flow in application to fuel assembly dynamic behavior. From the literature, it is difficult to estimate the damping induced by the flow. Therefore, it is proposed to study numerically the damping fluid forces on a cylinder for various parameters. It has been observed that it increases with the smaller confinement and with the presence of an obstacle and decreases when the Reynolds number increases. Larger values correspond to a greater contribution of pressure forces. Dynamic simulations are compared to the steady ones and give different values, but the order of magnitude and general trend remain the same. Therefore, steady simulations are suitable to have a rough estimation of drag coefficients in dynamics.

Research Article

Boiling Heat Transfer and Critical Heat Flux Enhancement Using Electrophoretic Deposition of SiO2 Nanofluid

The electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique was used to create a uniform SiO2 thin film coating on boiling plates, 4 mm in width and 9 mm in length. Significant enhancement in critical heat flux (CHF), for the hydrophilic surfaces generated by this anodic EPD method, has been observed. In order to increase the coating strength, the plates were sintered at various temperatures. To find the thickness and uniformity of the coatings, the SEM images were captured. The captured images showed that the coating thickness uniformly increased up to 90 nm for 0.5% nanofluid percentage by the EPD method. The results show that the hydrophilic and super-hydrophilic surfaces have different boiling heat transfer (BHT) coefficients and CHF behaviors. Also, the results showed an increase of 160% in the CHF value by sintering compared to a bare surface. However, because of the setup simplicity, the shape independency, the particle-coating uniformity, and thickness controllability, the EPD technique can be an appropriate option for modification of the surface and coating on the nuclear fuel cladding.

Research Article

Investigation of the Equivalent Test Condition for the Seismic Safety Assessment of a Spent Fuel Pool with regard to Sloshing Behavior

Spent fuel pools are used as temporary storage for spent fuel assemblies in nuclear power plants and are filled with coolant which removes the decaying heat from spent fuel assemblies. Sloshing of the coolant can occur if an earthquake occurs in the area. It may produce additional forces on the pool or inner structure and cause overflow of the coolant. It is therefore critical to investigate the phenomenon of sloshing in a seismic assessment of the spent fuel pool. The size of an actual spent fuel pool is excessive for carrying out an experimental study; thus, a scale model is necessary for experimentation. In this study, a scaling law was defined for test conditions using a scale model to understand sloshing behavior, and the results were validated via computational fluid dynamic analysis. Because sloshing is resonant in a fluid and the first mode natural frequency of a fluid is dominant in sloshing behavior, the test condition could be obtained based on the natural frequency of the fluid. In the model, which is scaled with a factor of “,” the scale factors “,” “,” “,” and “” were used for displacement, acceleration, excitation frequency, and excitation time, respectively. Approximately 5% difference in maximum sloshing height between two models was predicted in the only case that 1/8 and 1/4 models (1/8 and 1/4 scaled down from an actual spent fuel pool) were excited with 10 Hz and 7.071 Hz, respectively, but the same sloshing height and pressure were predicted in other cases. The results of this study support the idea that the Froude scaling law can be used when using a scale model for a seismic assessment of spent fuel pools to investigate sloshing behavior.

Research Article

Impact of Strontium and Krypton Release from Ghana’s MNSR following a Conjectural Accident Scenario

Accidental release of gaseous or liquid effluents is a critical issue and of a greater concern to the nuclear industry when it comes to the protection of the public and the environment. The emphasis becomes paramount when the release involves particulate of radiation particles. This paper provides a comprehensive insight report on an account of a research investigation carried out in addressing a radiological safety issue of Ghana’s Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) during its core conversion project. The amounts of Strontium-90 (Sr-90) and Krypton-85 (Kr-85) effluents presumably released from the reactor hall to the surroundings and the consequential emission radiation to the working area within a 200 m radius were analyzed for a six-month working period. The objective was to estimate specifically the approximate total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) of Sr-90 and Kr-85 by considering a conjectural accident scenario using a well-recognized and user-friendly known atmospheric dispersion model before the preparatory period. The maximum TEDE value recorded at a ground deposition value of 4.6E − 01 kBq/m2 was approximately 1.80E − 02 mSv and 4.90E − 4 mSv for Sr-90 and Kr-85, respectively, at a maximum distance of 0.1 km from the source. The estimated dose values recorded were found to be within the recommended regulatory safety limits of 50 mSv for onsite workers and 1 mSv for the general public. No adverse effect was experienced with respect to human health and the environment.

Research Article

A Fracture Criterion for Prediction of Fracture Initiation of Metal Materials at Various Stress States for Nuclear Waste Storage

A fracture criterion is newly proposed to evaluate fracture behavior and predict fracture initiation of metal materials in different complicated stress states for four different fracture mechanisms including quasicleavage fracture, normal fracture with void, shear fracture with void, and shear fracture without void. The dominant factors of these four different mechanisms are distinct, so it is impossible to capture all features of fracture initiation under different stress states with a single criterion, and different functions are necessary to predict fracture initiation of different mechanisms. In the new fracture criterion, different branches of the fracture criterion have been proposed corresponding to different fracture mechanisms. Quasicleavage fracture and normal fracture with void are described as a function of the principal stress, shear fracture with void is a function of the stress triaxiality and maximal shear stress, and shear fracture without void is only controlled by the maximal shear stress. The new fracture criterion is applied to predict the fracture initiation site and the fracture direction of nodular cast iron QT400-15 in combined tension-torsion tests. Predicted results are compared with experimental results to validate the performance of the new criterion in the intermediate stress triaxiality between 0 and 1/3. The new criterion is also applied to predict the crack initiation site and the direction of crack initiation of LY12 aluminium alloy and HY130 mild steel in mixed mode fracture tests to validate the performance of the new criterion in the high stress triaxiality. The new fracture criterion gives consistent results for these materials in a wide stress triaxiality range. It is shown that the new fracture criterion is a better supplement to the deficiency of fracture mechanics and also a better amendment to traditional strength theory in complicated stress states. Therefore, the new fracture criterion is recommended to be utilized to evaluate the fracture initiation of metal structures in nuclear waste storage and other engineering applications.

Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision75 days
Acceptance to publication48 days
CiteScore0.810
Impact Factor1.082
 Submit