Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations
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Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision60 days
Acceptance to publication39 days
CiteScore0.810
Impact Factor1.082
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Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis of the Maximum Fuel Temperature under Accident Condition of HTR-PM

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Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations publishes research on issues related to the nuclear industry, particularly the installations of nuclear technology, and aims to promote development in the area of nuclear sciences and technologies.

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Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations maintains an Editorial Board of practicing researchers from around the world, to ensure manuscripts are handled by editors who are experts in the field of study.

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Research Article

New Structural Seismic Isolation for Nuclear Containment Structures

The new Structural Seismic Isolation System (SSIS) intends to provide high safety for important structures such as nuclear power plants, offshore oil platforms, and high-rise buildings against near-fault and long-period earthquakes. The presented SSIS structure foot base and foundation contact surfaces have been designed as any curved surfaces (spherical, elliptical, etc.) depending on the earthquake-soil-superstructure parameters, and these contact surfaces have been separated by using elastomeric (lead core rubber or laminated rubber bearings with up to 4-second period) seismic isolation devices. It would allow providing inverse pendulum behavior to the structure. As a result of this behavior, the natural period of the structure will possess greater intervals which are larger than the predominant period of the majority of the possible earthquakes including near-fault zones. Consequently, the structure can maintain its serviceability after the occurrence of strong and long-period earthquakes. This study has investigated the performance of the SSIS for the nuclear containment (SSIS-NC) structure. The finite element model of SISS-NC structure has been developed, and nonlinear dynamic analysis of the model has been conducted under the strong and long-period ground motions. The results have been presented in comparison with the conventional application method of the seismic base isolation devices for nuclear containment (CAMSBID-NC) and fixed base nuclear containment (FB-NC) structures. The base and top accelerations, effective stress, and critical shear stress responses of the SSIS-NC structure are 48.67%, 36.70%, and 32.60% on average lower than those of CAMSBID-NC structure, respectively. The result also confirms that the SSIS-NC structure did not cause resonant vibrations under long-period earthquakes. On the other hand, there is excessive deformation in the isolation layers of CAMSBID-NC structure.

Research Article

New Strategies in the Code of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (CUSA) and Its Application in the Nuclear Reactor Calculation

Best-Estimation Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) analysis method can provide more information to improve the reliability of calculation results than the safety analysis with conservative assumption. And the statistical sampling-based uncertainty and sensitivity analysis methods are widely used in practical applications of the multiphysics, multiscale coupling nuclear reactor system. In this paper, a novel and efficient sampling method for inputs with normal and uniform distributions is introduced and a systematic theory for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is established based on the classical statistical theory. Then the Code of Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis (CUSA) is updated based on these new strategies. For applications, the explicit and implicit effects for resonance and nonresonance isotopes are studied in depth, and a simple UO2 pin cell is considered to examine the performance of CUSA and the total uncertainty and sensitivity analysis abilities. The numerical results indicate that the implicit sensitivity analysis model and the uncertainty quantification functions developed in CUSA are correct and can be used for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in nuclear reactor calculations. Even more important, the LHS-SVDC is recommended to propagate the uncertainties in multigroup cross sections.

Research Article

Perturbation Theory-Based Whole-Core Eigenvalue Sensitivity and Uncertainty (SU) Analysis via a 2D/1D Transport Code

For nuclear reactor physics, uncertainties in the multigroup cross sections inevitably exist, and these uncertainties are considered as the most significant uncertainty source. Based on the home-developed 3D high-fidelity neutron transport code HNET, the perturbation theory was used to directly calculate the sensitivity coefficient of keff to the multigroup cross sections, and a reasonable relative covariance matrix with a specific energy group structure was generated directly from the evaluated covariance data by using the transforming method. Then, the “Sandwich Rule” was applied to quantify the uncertainty of keff. Based on these methods, a new SU module in HNET was developed to directly quantify the keff uncertainty with one-step deterministic transport methods. To verify the accuracy of the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of HNET, an infinite-medium problem and the 2D pin-cell problem were used to perform SU analysis, and the numerical results demonstrate that acceptable accuracy of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of the HNET are achievable. Finally, keff SU analysis of a 3D minicore was analyzed by using the HNET, and some important conclusions were also drawn from the numerical results.

Research Article

Supercritical CO2 Brayton Cycle Design for Small Modular Reactor with a Thermodynamic Analysis Solver

Coupling supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO2) Brayton cycle with Gen-IV reactor concepts could bring advantages of high compactness and efficiency. This study aims to design proper simple and recompression S-CO2 Brayton cycles working as the indirect cooling system for a mediate-temperature lead fast reactor and quantify the Brayton cycle performance with different heat rejection temperatures (from 32°C to 55°C) to investigate its potential use in different scenarios, like arid desert areas or areas with abundant water supply. High-efficiency S-CO2 Brayton cycle could offset the power conversion efficiency decrease caused by low core outlet temperature (which is 480°C in this study) and high compressor inlet temperature (which varies from 32°C to 55°C in this study). A thermodynamic analysis solver is developed to provide the analysis tool. The solver includes turbomachinery models for compressor and turbine and heat exchanger models for recuperator and precooler. The optimal design of simple Brayton cycle and recompression Brayton cycle for the lead fast reactor under water-cooled and dry-cooled conditions are carried out with consideration of recuperator temperature difference constraints and cycle efficiency. Optimal cycle efficiencies of 40.48% and 35.9% can be achieved for the recompression Brayton cycle and simple Brayton cycle under water-cooled condition. Optimal cycle efficiencies of 34.36% and 32.6% can be achieved for the recompression Brayton cycle and simple Brayton cycle under dry-cooled condition (compressor inlet temperature equals to 55°C). Increasing the dry cooling flow rate will be helpful to decrease the compressor inlet temperature. Every 5°C decrease in the compressor inlet temperature will bring 1.2% cycle efficiency increase for the recompression Brayton cycle and 0.7% cycle efficiency increase for the simple Brayton cycle. Helpful conclusions and advises are proposed for designing the Brayton cycle for mediate-temperature nuclear applications in this paper.

Research Article

Experimental Approaches for Manufacturing of Simulated Cladding and Simulated Fuel Rod for Mechanical Decladder

We are developing a practical-scale mechanical decladder that can slit nuclear spent fuel rod-cuts (hulls + pellets) on the order of several tens of kgf of heavy metal/batch to supply UO2 pellets to a voloxidation process. The mechanical decladder is used for separating and recovering nuclear fuel material from the cladding tube by horizontally slitting the cladding tube of a fuel rod. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is improving the performance of the mechanical decladder to increase the recovery rate of pellets from spent fuel rods. However, because actual nuclear spent fuel is dangerously toxic, we need to develop simulated spent fuel rods for continuous experiments with mechanical decladders. We describe procedures to develop both simulated cladding tubes and simulated fuel rod (with physical properties similar to those of spent nuclear fuel). Performance tests were carried out to evaluate the decladding ability of the mechanical decladder using two types of simulated fuel (simulated tube + brass pellets and zircaloy-4 tube + simulated ceramic fuel rod). The simulated tube was developed for analyzing the slitting characteristics of the cross section of the spent fuel cladding tube. Simulated ceramic fuel rod (with mechanical properties similar to the pellets of actual PWR spent fuel) was produced to ensure that the mechanical decladder could slit real PWR spent fuel. We used castable powder pellets that simulate the compressive stress of the real spent UO2 pellet. The production criteria for simulated pellets with compressive stresses similar to those of actual spent fuel were determined, and the castables were inserted into zircaloy-4 tubes and sintered to produce the simulated fuel rod. To investigate the slitting characteristics of the simulated ceramic fuel rod, a verification experiment was performed using a mechanical decladder.

Research Article

Radiological Safety Analysis for a Hypothetical Accident of a Generic VVER-1000 Nuclear Power Plant

Atmospheric dispersion modelling and radiological safety analysis have been performed for a postulated accident scenario of a generic VVER-1000 nuclear power plant using the HotSpot Health Physics code. The total effective dose equivalent (TEDE), the respiratory time-integrated air concentration, and the ground deposition concentration are calculated considering site-specific meteorological conditions. The results show that the maximum TEDE and ground deposition concentration values of 3.69E – 01 Sv and 3.80E + 06 kBq/m2 occurred at downwind distance of 0.18 km from the release point. This maximum TEDE value is recorded within a distance where public occupation is restricted. The TEDE values at distances of 5.0 km and beyond where public occupation is likely to be found are far below the annual regulatory limits of 1 mSv from public exposure in a year even in the event of worse accident scenario as set in IAEA Safety Standard No. GSR Part 3; no action related specifically to the public exposure is required. The released radionuclides might be transported to long distances but will not have any harmful effect on the public. The direction of the radionuclide emission from the release point is towards the north east. It is observed that the organ with the highest value of committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) appears to be the thyroid. It was followed by the bone surface, lung, red marrow, and lower large intestine wall in order of decreasing CEDE value. Radionuclides including I-131, I-133, Sr-89, Cs-134, Ba-140, Xe-133, and Xe-135 were found to be the main contributors to the CEDE.

Science and Technology of Nuclear Installations
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate33%
Submission to final decision60 days
Acceptance to publication39 days
CiteScore0.810
Impact Factor1.082
 Submit