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Shock and Vibration
Volume 9, Issue 6, Pages 319-328
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2002/109715

Fatigue Failure Results for Multi-Axial versus Uniaxial Stress Screen Vibration Testing

Wayne E. Whiteman1 and Morris S. Berman2

1Department of Civil and Mechanical Engineering, US Military Academy, West Point, New York, USA
2Weapons & Materials Research Directorate, US Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Maryland, USA

Received 12 November 2001; Revised 12 March 2002

Copyright © 2002 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

To date, the failure potential and prediction between simultaneous multi-axial versus sequentially applied uniaxial vibration stress screen testing has been the subject of great debate. In most applications, current vibration tests are done by sequentially applying uniaxial excitation to the test specimen along three orthogonal axes. The most common standards for testing military equipment are published in MIL-STD-810F and NAVMAT P-9492. Previous research had shown that uniaxial testing may be unrealistic and inadequate. This current research effort is a continuing effort to systematically investigate the differences between fatigue damage mechanisms and the effects of uniaxial versus tri-axial testing. This includes assessing the ability of the tri-axial method in predicting the formation of damage mechanisms, specifically looking at the effects of stress or fatigue failure. Multi-axial testing achieves the synergistic effect of exciting all modes simultaneously and induces a more realistic vibration stress loading condition. As such, it better approximates real-world operating conditions. This paper provides the latest results on the differences between multi-axial and uniaxial testing of a simple notched cantilever beam.