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Shock and Vibration
Volume 17, Issue 1, Pages 55-69
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/SAV-2010-0498

The Spectrum Dip of Deck Mounted Systems

R.J. Scavuzzo,1 G.D. Hill,2 and P.W. Saxe2

1Professor of Mechanical Engineering Emeritus, The University of Akron, Akron, OH, USA
2Alion Science and Technology, 4300 King St., Suite 101, Alexandria, VA, USA

Received 19 March 2008; Revised 19 March 2008

Copyright © 2010 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In this paper, a detailed model of a ship deck and attached dynamic systems was developed and subjected to dynamic studies using two different shock inputs: a triangular shaped velocity pulse and the vertical motion of the innerbottom of the standard Floating Shock Platform (FSP). Two studies were conducted, one considering four single degree-of-freedom systems attached at various deck locations and another considering a three-mass system attached at one location. The two shock inputs were used only for the multi-mass system study. The triangular pulse was used for the four single degree-of-freedom systems study. For the single degree-of-freedom systems study, shock spectra were first calculated at the four mounting locations assuming the oscillators were not present. Then the oscillator systems were added to these grid points to determine the change in the shock spectra. First, the oscillators were added one at a time, and then all the oscillators were added to the deck. The multi-mass system was analyzed using both shock inputs. First, the fixed-base modal masses and frequencies were determined. Then, the system as a whole was attached to the deck and the spectrum values at the base point were determined and compared to those for the free deck case. In the last step each mode of the multi-mass system, represented by a single degree-of-freedom system with the modal mass and appropriate spring stiffness, was considered individually to determine the spectrum responses. Results of the free deck, the entire system and individual modal responses are compared.