The Scientific World Journal
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Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision68 days
Acceptance to publication29 days
CiteScore2.900
Impact Factor-

Predicting the Mesiodistal Crown Dimensions of the Permanent First Molars from the Deciduous Second Molars

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Research Article

Chemical Composition and Digestibility of Major Feed Resources in Tanqua-Abergelle District of Central Tigray, Northern Ethiopia

Background. A detailed study on the feed quantity and quality is required to document the available feeds and their nutritional values. Aim. The study was aimed to investigate and document the chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility of major feed resources available in Tanqua-Abergelle district of central Tigray, northern Ethiopia. Methods. Ten different feed resources were evaluated for their nutritive values. Representative feed samples were collected and prepared following appropriate procedures. The samples were subjected to analysis of chemical composition and in vitro dry matter digestibility (IVDMD) using proper scientific procedures. Results. Wide variations were observed in nutritive values of the investigated feeds. The highest crude protein (CP) was measured in Atella (15.90%) followed by green grass (13.20%), mill waste (10.90%), groundnut straw (9.18%), and cowpea straw (8.11%) in descending order. Mill waste (11.84 MJ/kg DM) and Atella (11.81 MJ/kg DM) had the highest metabolizable energy (ME) followed by green grass (9.83 MJ/kg DM), groundnut straw (9.28 MJ/kg DM), Teff straw (8.56 MJ/kg DM), and cowpea straw (8.39 MJ/kg DM) in that order. The highest NDF was recorded in groundnut null (79.80%) and the lowest NDF in mill waste (35.00%) and Atella (40.60%). The highest IVDMD was seen in mill waste (81.43%) and Atella (81.21%) and the lowest in groundnut hull (39.95%). Conclusion. The nonconventional feeds have moderate protein and reduced fiber contents, and thus, they can be utilized as supplement for poor-quality feeds. These feeds need further investigation using animals to substantiate the current study.

Research Article

Geospatial Assessment of Floods in Western Nepal

Floods are major problems, and their coexistence poses a potent threat, which cannot be eradicated but has to be managed. Extreme affects untold numbers of people, taxing economies, disrupting food production, creating unrest, and prompting migrations. There is much more that can be done to understand the effects of floods, particularly to help protect the poorest and most vulnerable. This research was carried out in the affected area of Bhimdatta municipality and aimed to find out the flood event of 2013 and present the scenario done for flood disaster management. The primary data were collected by direct observation and key informant survey. Landsat images were downloaded from USGS websites, and secondary information was collected through previous research and articles. The data were analyzed by using ArcGIS. It was found that the flood had created a negligible impact on the forest, high impact on the river itself, and average impact on land. 0.13% of forests, 17.38% of land, and 82.48% of river bodies were affected by the flood of 2013. Different governmental and nongovernmental organizations played an effective role for flood disaster management.

Research Article

Influence of Dentin Priming with Tannin-Rich Plant Extracts on the Longevity of Bonded Composite Restorations

Objective. This in vitro study evaluated the influence of bioactive plant extracts as dentin biomodifying agents to improve the longevity of bonded restorations. For that, plant extracts were applied to the dentin surface prior to the adhesive system. Materials and Methods. Bovine incisors were ground flat to obtain 2 mm thick slices in which conical preparations were made (N = 10). Tannin-containing plant extracts were applied to dentin before the application of the restorative system, as follows: control group (untreated, CTL), chlorhexidine 0.12% (CHX), mastruz (Dysphania ambrosioides, MTZ), cat’s claw (Uncaria tomentosa, CTC), guarana (Paullinia cupana, GUA), galla chinensis (Rhus chinensis, GCH), and tannic acid (extracted from Acacia decurrens, TNA). The push-out bond strength test was conducted (0.5 mm/min). Dentin biomodification was assessed by the modulus of elasticity and mass change in bovine tooth sections (0.5 × 1.7 × 7.0 mm). The dentin staining after extract treatments of dentin slices was compared. The dentin surface wettability was also evaluated by means of the contact angles of the adhesive system with the dentin surface and compared with the untreated control group. Data were subjected to ANOVA/Tukey’s test (α = 0.05). Results. The bond strength of the restoratives to dentin was not significantly improved by the plant extracts, irrespective of the evaluation time (). Except for TNA, the elastic modulus of demineralized dentin significantly reduced after treatment with the plant extracts (). The dentin staining correlated with the tannin content of the extracts. The contact angle was significantly reduced when treated with CTC, GCH, and TNA. Conclusions. The tannin-containing extracts had a questionable effect on the longevity of bonded restorations. The dentin modulus was negatively affected by the extract treatments. Although some of the extracts changed the contact angle, which seems to improve the adhesive monomer permeation, the tannin-rich plant extract application prior to adhesive application was proven to be clinically unfeasible due to dentin staining.

Research Article

Predicting the Most Deleterious Missense Nonsynonymous Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of Hennekam Syndrome-Causing CCBE1 Gene, In Silico Analysis

Hennekam lymphangiectasia-lymphedema syndrome has been linked to single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the CCBE1 (collagen and calcium-binding EGF domains 1) gene. Several bioinformatics methods were used to find the most dangerous nsSNPs that could affect CCBE1 structure and function. Using state-of-the-art in silico tools, this study examined the most pathogenic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) that disrupt the CCBE1 protein and extracellular matrix remodeling and migration. Our results indicate that seven nsSNPs, rs115982879, rs149792489, rs374941368, rs121908254, rs149531418, rs121908251, and rs372499913, are deleterious in the CCBE1 gene, four (G330E, C102S, C174R, and G107D) of which are the highly deleterious, two of them (G330E and G107D) have never been seen reported in the context of Hennekam syndrome. Twelve missense SNPs, rs199902030, rs267605221, rs37517418, rs80008675, rs116596858, rs116675104, rs121908252, rs147974432, rs147681552, rs192224843, rs139059968, and rs148498685, are found to revert into stop codons. Structural homology-based methods and sequence homology-based tools revealed that 8.8% of the nsSNPs are pathogenic. SIFT, PolyPhen2, M-CAP, CADD, FATHMM-MKL, DANN, PANTHER, Mutation Taster, LRT, and SNAP2 had a significant score for identifying deleterious nsSNPs. The importance of rs374941368 and rs200149541 in the prediction of post-translation changes was highlighted because it impacts a possible phosphorylation site. Gene-gene interactions revealed CCBE1’s association with other genes, showing its role in a number of pathways and coexpressions. The top 16 deleterious nsSNPs found in this research should be investigated further in the future while researching diseases caused CCBE1 gene specifically HS. The FT web server predicted amino acid residues involved in the ligand-binding site of the CCBE1 protein, and two of the substitutions (R167W and T153N) were found to be involved. These highly deleterious nsSNPs can be used as marker pathogenic variants in the mutational diagnosis of the HS syndrome, and this research also offers potential insights that will aid in the development of precision medicines. CCBE1 proteins from Hennekam syndrome patients should be tested in animal models for this purpose.

Research Article

Effects of Binahong (Anredera cordifolia (Tenore) Steenis) Extracts on the Levels of Malondialdehyde (MDA) in Cataract Goat Lenses

Cataracts are one of the most causes of blindness in the world. Oxidative stress can form pathological conditions such as cataracts. This oxidative stress ability can be measured by the malondialdehyde (MDA) biomarker. Binahong leaves (Anredera cordifolia (Tenore) Steenis) are native plants from Indonesia that are used to treat various diseases including cataract treatment. Binahong leaf (Anredera cordifolia (Tenore) Steenis) has a high amount of flavonoids and is rich in antioxidants that can be used to treat cataracts. Objective. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of binahong leaf extract on the levels of MDA in a goat lens with cataract-induced material. Method. As many as possible, 40 goat eye lenses were divided into several groups, namely, group I normal lenses as controls (glucose 5.5 mM), group II lenses were cataract induced with glucose concentration of 55 mM, group III lenses with glucose 55 mM + binahong leaf extract (100 μg/ml), group IV lens with glucose 55 mM + binahong leaf extract (200 μg/ml), and group V lens with glucose 55 mM + quercetin (positive control). Biochemical parameters measured in the lens homogenate are malondialdehyde lens morphology in all groups’ observations and comparisons made. Results. The results of the study found that the lens group with the addition of binahong extract showed more results transparency compared to lens groups induced by glucose concentrations of 55 mM). This shows that the diabetic cataract group experienced high oxidative stress due to the accumulation of sorbitol compounds derived from glucose which caused turbidity in the goat eye lens and increased levels of lens MDA. Binahong levels at concentrations of 100 or 200 can inhibit MDA production. Conclusion. Binahong (Anredera cordifolia (Tenore) Steenis) extract has the ability to inhibit the production of MDA levels. In glucose-induced goat lenses, binahong extract and quercetin show antioxidant and anticataract properties.

Research Article

Comparative Study of Phytochemical, Antioxidant, and Cytotoxic Activities and Phenolic Content of Syzygium aqueum (Burm. f. Alston f.) Extracts Growing in West Sumatera Indonesia

Syzygium aqueum, consisting of various fruit colors, is one of the plants that have been used as traditional medicine. This study aims to evaluate and compare phytochemical, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities and total phenolic content of leaves and stem bark extracts of S. aqueum with pink and red fruits, in order to identify the best extract that can be used as a natural antioxidant. Phytochemical constituents were evaluated qualitatively using chemicals, while cytotoxic activities were identified using the brine shrimp lethality test. Total phenolic content was determined via the Folin–Ciocalteu method. Leaves and stem bark of S. aqueum contained flavonoids, phenolics, and triterpenoids, but the stem bark also contained saponins and alkaloids. Methanol and ethyl acetate extracts of leaves and stem bark were categorized as very powerful antioxidants to DPPH (IC50 9.71–38.69 μg/mL) and hydrogen peroxide (IC50 16.44–44.02 μg/mL), while hexane extracts were inactive. Methanol, ethyl acetate, and hexane extracts of leaves and stem bark were categorized as moderately cytotoxic to A. salina larvae (LC50 104.04–440.65 μg/mL). Comparing leaves and stem barks, antioxidant and cytotoxic activities of stem bark extracts were higher than those of leaves extracts. Total phenolic content of leaves extracts was higher than that of stem bark extracts where the order of total phenolic content progressed from methanol extracts > ethyl acetate extracts > hexane extracts. Therefore, the stem bark of S. aqueum was identified as the better source of natural antioxidant compared with the leaves.

The Scientific World Journal
 Journal metrics
Acceptance rate24%
Submission to final decision68 days
Acceptance to publication29 days
CiteScore2.900
Impact Factor-
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