Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 4 (2004), Pages 307-314
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/tsw.2004.30
Research Article

Snoezelen or Controlled Multisensory Stimulation. Treatment Aspects from Israel

1National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, Office of the Medical Director, Division for Mental Retardation, Ministry of Social Affairs, Jerusalem, Israel
2Zvi Quittman Residential Center, The Millie Shime Campus, Elwyn Jerusalem, Israel
3Faculty of Social Science, Department of Behavioral Sciences, Academic College of Judea and Samaria, Ariel, Israel
4Department of Physical Therapy, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Stanley Steyer School of Health Professions, Tel Aviv University, Israel

Received 1 February 2004; Revised 14 April 2004; Accepted 16 April 2004

Academic Editor: Mohammed Morad

Copyright © 2004 Joav Merrick et al.

Abstract

In Israel today, with a total population of over 6 million persons, the Division for Mental Retardation (DMR) provides services to 23,000 persons with intellectual disability (ID). Of the 23,000, residential services are provided to more than 6,000 in close to 60 residential centers, another 2,000 are provided residential care in hostels or group homes in the community in about 50 locations, while the rest are served with day-care kindergarten, day-treatment centers, sheltered workshops, or integrated care in the community. The first Snoezelen room (controlled multisensory stimulation) in the DMR was established at the Bnei Zion residential care center in 1995. The Snoezelen method is now used in Israel in more than 30 residential care centers and 3 community settings. Since the year 2000, a physiotherapist has been employed in order to supervise the treatment and development of the method nationally. Professional staff meetings take place every 4 months. A certification course has been established on a national basis for individuals from different professions (occupational therapists, physiotherapists, teachers, music therapists, nurses, speech therapists, or caregivers). Snoezelen has proved to be an important instrument and a powerful therapeutic tool among the various treatment modules employed in Israel for persons with ID. This paper presents the concept illustrated with two case stories.