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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 11 (2011), Pages 1726-1734
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/172893
Review Article

Serotonergic Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease and Its Relevance to Disability

Centre for Neuroscience, Division of Experimental Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Imperial College London, London W12 0NN, UK

Received 6 June 2011; Accepted 24 August 2011

Academic Editor: R. E. Tanzi

Copyright © 2011 Marios Politis and Clare Loane. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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