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Volume 11 (2011), Pages 2391-2402
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/213962
Review Article

Macrophage Polarization in Health and Disease

1Department of Developmental and Molecular Biology, Center for the Study of Reproductive Biology and Women's Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 10461, USA
2Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 44 Binney Street, Boston, MA 02115, USA
3AIDS Immunopathogenesis Unit, Division of Immunology, Transplantation and Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, San Raffaele Scientific Institute and Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, P2/P3 Laboratories, DIBIT-1, Via Olgettina No. 58, 20132 Milano, Italy

Received 30 October 2011; Accepted 9 November 2011

Academic Editor: Marco Antonio Cassatella

Copyright © 2011 Luca Cassetta et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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