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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 11, Pages 1893-1907
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/371893
Review Article

Interaction between 𝛼 -Synuclein and Other Proteins in Neurodegenerative Disorders

Institute of Clinical Neurobiology, Kenyongasse 18, A-1070 Vienna, Austria

Received 30 August 2011; Accepted 10 October 2011

Academic Editors: O. Katsuse, R. Perneczky, D. R. Thal, and Y. Yoshiyama

Copyright © 2011 Kurt A. Jellinger. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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