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TheScientificWorldJOURNAL
Volume 11, Pages 2364-2381
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2011/741046
Review Article

Biochemistry of the Phagosome: The Challenge to Study a Transient Organelle

1Département de Biologie, Université Paris-Sud, Bâtiment 443, rue des Adeles, 91405 Orsay, France
2INSERM, U757, Phagocyte Signal Transduction Group, 91405 Orsay, France

Received 16 September 2011; Accepted 26 October 2011

Academic Editor: Marco Antonio Cassatella

Copyright © 2011 Oliver Nüsse. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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