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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 137071, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/137071
Research Article

Assessing Topographical Orientation Skills in Cannabis Users

1Dipartimento di Psicologia, “Sapienza” Università di Roma, 00185 Rome, Italy
2Sezione di Neuropsicologia, IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, 00179 Rome, Italy
3Departments of Psychology and Clinical Neurosciences and Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB, Canada T2N 1N4

Received 12 October 2011; Accepted 17 November 2011

Academic Editors: S. Borgwardt and C. Miniussi

Copyright © 2012 Liana Palermo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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