Table of Contents Author Guidelines Submit a Manuscript
Retracted

This article has been retracted as it was found to contain falsified data. Additionally, it was found that the same article was published in Ginekologia Polska (2012, 83, 2, 111-115).

The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 202804, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/202804
Clinical Study

Increasing the Stimulation Dose of rFSH in Unexpected Poor Responders Is Not Associated with Better IVF Outcome

IVF Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Haydarpasa Training Hospital, Gulhane Military Medical Academy, Haydarpasa, 34668 Istanbul, Turkey

Received 11 October 2011; Accepted 14 December 2011

Academic Editor: Jose G. Cecatti

Copyright © 2012 Levent Tutuncu and Ozgur Dundar. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

The aim of this retrospective study is to determine whether increasing the stimulation dose of rFSH in unexpected poor responders is associated with better in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome or not. A total of forty eligible women who fulfilled our definition of poor responders and who did not achieve an ongoing pregnancy in the first cycle and returned for a second higher rFSH dose IVF cycle with a long-agonist protocol were included to the study. The first low-dose cycles and the second high-dose cycles were compared to each other. Main outcome measures of the study were duration of stimulation, number of follicles, number of oocytes retrieved, number of embryos, and E2 level on day of hCG injection. There were no significant differences in duration of stimulation, number of follicles, number of oocytes retrieved, number of embryos, and E2 level on day of hCG injection between the first low- and second high-dose cycles. Daily dose and total dose of rFSH were significantly higher in the second high-dose cycles. Increasing the dose of rFSH in a second stimulation cycle after first unsuccessful treatment cycle will add only to the cost and discomfort of the treatment and might adversely affect pregnancy rates.