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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 254962, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/254962
Review Article

Transcriptome and Proteome Research in Veterinary Science: What Is Possible and What Questions Can Be Asked?

Institut für Tierpathologie, Universität Berlin, Robert-von-Ostertag-Strasse 15, 14163 Berlin, Germany

Received 3 October 2011; Accepted 2 November 2011

Academic Editor: Kenneth D. Clinkenbeard

Copyright © 2012 Robert Klopfleisch and Achim D. Gruber. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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