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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 291435, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/291435
Research Article

Differential Responses of Two Broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var Italica) Cultivars to Salinity and Nutritional Quality Improvement

1Laboratoire d'Aridoculture et Cultures Oasiennes, Institut des Régions Arides, Route de Djerba Km 22.5, Médenine 4119, Tunisia
2Department of Plant Nutrition, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura (CEBAS-CSIC), Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Ap. de Correos 164, 30100 Murcia, Spain
3Department of Food Science and Technology, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura (CEBAS-CSIC), Campus Universitario de Espinardo, Ap. de Correos 164, 30100 Murcia, Spain

Received 2 May 2012; Accepted 30 May 2012

Academic Editors: C. Cilas, C. de Souza, and R. Sarkar

Copyright © 2012 Chokri Zaghdoud et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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