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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 413091, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/413091
Review Article

Peripheral Nerve Repair with Cultured Schwann Cells: Getting Closer to the Clinics

1Center of Excellence for Aging and Brain Repair, Department of Neurosurgery and Brain Repair, University of South Florida College of Medicine, 12901 Bruce B. Downs Boulvard, Tampa, FL 33612, USA
2Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, 14000 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil
3Department of Surgery and Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, 14000 Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brazil

Received 9 January 2012; Accepted 26 January 2012

Academic Editors: B. Blits and A. Irintchev

Copyright © 2012 Maria Carolina O. Rodrigues et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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