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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 475675, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/475675
Review Article

Metabolic Basis for Thyroid Hormone Liver Preconditioning: Upregulation of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

1Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology Program, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of Chile, Santiago, Chile
2Faculty of Medicine, Diego Portales University, Santiago, Chile

Received 5 March 2012; Accepted 17 April 2012

Academic Editors: H. M. Abu-Soud and D. Benke

Copyright © 2012 Luis A. Videla et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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