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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 518568, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/518568
Research Article

Effect of Low-Frequency Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation on Naming Abilities in Early-Stroke Aphasic Patients: A Prospective, Randomized, Double-Blind Sham-Controlled Study

1Second Department of Neurology, Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, 9 Sobieskiego St., 02-957 Warsaw, Poland
2Department of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology, Medical University of Warsaw, 26/28 Krakowskie Przedmieście St., 00-927 Warsaw, Poland

Received 27 August 2012; Accepted 14 October 2012

Academic Editors: C. Barwood, N. Mashal, B. E. Murdoch, and S. Riek

Copyright © 2012 Konrad Waldowski et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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