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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 525827, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/525827
Research Article

The Impact of Root Temperature on Photosynthesis and Isoprene Emission in Three Different Plant Species

1Institute of Agro-Environmental & Forest Biology (IBAF), National Research Council (CNR), Via Salaria km 29,300, 00015 Monterotondo Scalo, Rome, Italy
2Department for Innovation in Biological, Agro-food and Forest systems (DIBAF), University of Tuscia, Via S. Camillo De Lellis snc, 01100 Viterbo, Italy
3Department of Agronomy, Food, Natural Resources, Animals, Environment (DAFNAE), University of Padova, Agripolis, Viale dell'Università 16, 35020 Legnaro, Italy
4Institute of Plant Protection (IPP), National Research Council (CNR), Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, Italy

Received 13 March 2012; Accepted 1 April 2012

Academic Editors: A. Bosabalidis and J. S. Carrion

Copyright © 2012 Mauro Medori et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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