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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 594657, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/594657
Clinical Study

Noni Juice Improves Serum Lipid Profiles and Other Risk Markers in Cigarette Smokers

1Department of Pathology, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, 1601 Parkview Avenue, Rockford, IL 61107, USA
2Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Illinois College of Medicine at Rockford, 1601 Parkview Avenue, Rockford, IL 61107, USA
3Department of Research and Development, Morinda Inc., 737 East 1180 South, American Fork, UT 84003, USA

Received 11 July 2012; Accepted 13 September 2012

Academic Editors: W. Gelderblom, S. Knasmuller, P. Maček, and R. Pohjanvirta

Copyright © 2012 Mian-Ying Wang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Cigarette smoke-induced oxidative stress leads to dyslipidemia and systemic inflammation. Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit juice has been found previously to have a significant antioxidant activity. One hundred thirty-two adult heavy smokers completed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to investigate the effect of noni juice on serum cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and homocysteine. Volunteers drank noni juice or a fruit juice placebo daily for one month. Drinking 29.5 mL to 188 mL of noni juice per day significantly reduced cholesterol levels, triglycerides, and hs-CRP. Decreases in LDL and homocysteine, as well increases in HDL, were also observed among noni juice drinkers. The placebo, which was devoid of iridoid glycosides, did not significantly influence blood lipid profiles or hs-CRP. Noni juice was able to mitigate cigarette smoke-induced dyslipidemia, an activity associated with the presence of iridoids.