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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 680632, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/680632
Review Article

Development of Communication Behaviour: Receiver Ontogeny in Túngara Frogs and a Prospectus for a Behavioural Evolutionary Development

1Section of Integrative Biology, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712, USA
2Department of Migration and Immunoecology, Max Planck Institute for Ornithology, 78315 Radolfzell, Germany
3Department of Biology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523, USA
4Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, P.O. Box 0843-03092, Balboa Ancón, Panama

Received 16 October 2011; Accepted 4 January 2012

Academic Editor: Randall Bruce Widelitz

Copyright © 2012 Alexander T. Baugh et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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