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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 697201, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/697201
Research Article

Properties and Biocompatibility of Chitosan and Silk Fibroin Blend Films for Application in Skin Tissue Engineering

1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand
2Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Naresuan University, Phitsanulok 65000, Thailand
3Department of Orthopaedics, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand
4Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002, Thailand

Received 13 February 2012; Accepted 1 March 2012

Academic Editors: F. A. Simmen and Y. Ueta

Copyright © 2012 Witoo Luangbudnark et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Chitosan/silk fibroin (CS/SF) blend films were prepared and evaluated for feasibility of using the films as biomaterial for skin tissue engineering application. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry analysis indicated chemical interaction between chitosan and fibroin. Chitosan enhanced β-sheet conformation of fibroin and resulted in shifting of thermal degradation of the films. Flexibility, swelling index, and enzyme degradation were also increased by the chitosan content of the blend films. Biocompatibility of the blend films was determined by cultivation with fibroblast cells. All films showed no cytotoxicity by XTT assay. Fibroblast cells spread on CS/SF films via dendritic extensions, and cell-cell interactions were noted. Cell proliferation on CS/SF films was also demonstrated, and their phenotype was examined by the expression of collagen type I gene. These results showed possibility of using the CS/SF films as a supporting material for further study on skin tissue engineering.