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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 819328, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/819328
Research Article

Geographical Gradients in Argentinean Terrestrial Mammal Species Richness and Their Environmental Correlates

1Biogeography, Diversity, and Conservation Research Team, Department of Animal Biology, Faculty of Sciences, University of Malaga, 29071 Malaga, Spain
2Departamento de Ciencias Naturales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de La Pampa, Avenida Uruguay 151, Santa Rosa 6300, Argentina
3Instituto de Ecología y Ciencias Ambientales (IECA), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de la República, Iguá 4225, esq. Mataojo, Montevideo 11400, Uruguay
4“Rui Nabeiro” Biodiversity Chair, CIBIO, University of Évora, 7000-890 Évora, Portugal
5Division of Biology, Imperial College London, Silwood Park Campus, Ascot, Berkshire SL5 7PY, UK

Received 16 May 2012; Accepted 10 June 2012

Academic Editors: H. H. Basibuyuk and S. Giokas

Copyright © 2012 Ana L. Márquez et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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