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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 905468, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/905468
Research Article

Physiological and Growth Responses of Six Turfgrass Species Relative to Salinity Tolerance

1Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
2Department of Crop Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Selangor, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia
3Department of Land Management, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Malaysia

Received 13 January 2012; Accepted 26 February 2012

Academic Editor: Pablo Abbate

Copyright © 2012 Md. Kamal Uddin et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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