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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2012, Article ID 975189, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1100/2012/975189
Review Article

Emotional Competence as a Positive Youth Development Construct: A Conceptual Review

Department of Educational Psychology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Received 30 June 2011; Accepted 31 August 2011

Academic Editor: Joav Merrick

Copyright © 2012 Patrick S. Y. Lau and Florence K. Y. Wu. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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