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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 129841, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/129841
Review Article

Personalized Lifestyle Medicine: Relevance for Nutrition and Lifestyle Recommendations

Personalized Lifestyle Medicine Institute, 800 Fifth Avenue, Suite 4100, Seattle, WA 98104, USA

Received 29 April 2013; Accepted 4 June 2013

Academic Editors: E. Kirk, C. Palacios, E. van den Heuvel, and B. Venn

Copyright © 2013 Deanna M. Minich and Jeffrey S. Bland. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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