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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 158263, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/158263
Research Article

Autism, Processing Speed, and Adaptive Functioning in Preschool Children

1Gillberg Neuropsychiatry Centre, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Kungsgatan 12, 411 19 Gothenburg, Sweden
2Department of Psychology, Astrid Lindgren Children's Hospital, Stockholm, 171 76 Stockholm, Sweden
3Skaraborgs's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Research and Development Center and Unit of Developmental Disorders, Skaraborg's Hospital, 541 85 Skövde, Sweden
4Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Box 500, 40530 Gothenburg, Sweden

Received 25 February 2013; Accepted 16 April 2013

Academic Editors: R. J. Beninger, S. A. Freedman, and R. R. Tampi

Copyright © 2013 Åsa Hedvall et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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