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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 186505, 5 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/186505
Research Article

Antimelanoma and Antityrosinase from Alpinia galangal Constituents

1Department of Food Science, National Chiayi University, Chiayi 60083, Taiwan
2Department of Respiratory Therapy, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan
3Department of Fragrance and Cosmetic Science, Kaohsiung Medical University, 100 Shih-Chuan 1st Road, San-Ming District, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan
4Department of Cosmeceutics, College of Pharmacy, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
5Department of Marine Biotechnology and Resources, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan
6Graduate Institute of Natural Products, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung 80708, Taiwan

Received 22 April 2013; Accepted 28 May 2013

Academic Editors: H.-W. Chang, L.-Y. Chuang, S. Guleria, and S. Yasmin

Copyright © 2013 Chih-Yu Lo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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