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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 194918, 4 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/194918
Clinical Study

Children with Congenital Hypothyroidism Have Similar Neuroradiological Abnormal Findings as Healthy Ones

1Pediatric Endocrinology Service, Division of Pediatric, Assaf Harofeh Medical Center, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Zerifin 70300, Israel
2Division of Endocrinology, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8
3Department of Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8
4Department of Psychology and Pediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8
5Neuroscience and Mental Health Program, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON, Canada M5G 1X8

Received 9 August 2013; Accepted 2 September 2013

Academic Editors: D. Caselli and F. Kneepkens

Copyright © 2013 Marianna Rachmiel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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