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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 237260, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/237260
Research Article

Substrains of Inbred Mice Differ in Their Physical Activity as a Behavior

1UR4 Aging, Stress, Inflammation, University Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, 7 Quai Saint Bernard, 75005 Paris, France
2Department of Anatomical, Histological, Forensic & Orthopaedic Sciences, Section of Histology & Medical Embryology, Sapienza University of Rome, Via Scarpa 16, 00161 Rome, Italy
3Interuniversity Institute of Myology, 00161 Rome, Italy
4Laboratory of Translational Cardiomyology, Department of Development and Regeneration, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, 3000 Leuven, Belgium

Received 30 December 2012; Accepted 4 February 2013

Academic Editors: L. Guimarães-Ferreira, H. Nicastro, J. Wilson, and N. E. Zanchi

Copyright © 2013 Dario Coletti et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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