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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 308646, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/308646
Research Article

Competitive Interaction of Axonopus compressus and Asystasia gangetica under Contrasting Sunlight Intensity

1Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
2Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia
3Department of Land Management, Faculty of Agriculture, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia

Received 5 June 2013; Accepted 16 August 2013

Academic Editors: Q. Guo and H. Hasenauer

Copyright © 2013 B. Samedani et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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