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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 349702, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/349702
Research Article

A Multigene Approach for Comparing Genealogy of Betacoronavirus from Cattle and Horses

1Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, Avenue Professor Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva 87, Cidade Universitária, 05508-270 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
2Coronavirus Research Group, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, Avenue Professor Dr. Orlando Marques de Paiva 87, Cidade Universitária, 05508-270 São Paulo, SP, Brazil
3Jockey Club of São Paulo, Bento Frias Street 248, Group 555, 05423-050 São Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 6 September 2013; Accepted 3 October 2013

Academic Editors: E. F. Guèye and H. Suzuki

Copyright © 2013 Iracema N. Barros et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Gastroenteritis is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among young and newborn animals and is often caused by multiple intestinal infections, with rotavirus and bovine coronavirus (BCoV) being the main viral causes in cattle. Given that BCoV is better studied than equine coronaviruses and given the possibility of interspecies transmission of these viruses, this research was designed to compare the partial sequences of the spike glycoprotein (S), hemagglutinin-esterase protein (HE), and nucleoprotein (N) genes from coronaviruses from adult cattle with winter dysentery, calves with neonatal diarrhea, and horses. To achieve this, eleven fecal samples from dairy cows with winter dysentery, three from calves, and two from horses, all from Brazil, were analysed. It could be concluded that the enteric BCoV genealogy from newborn and adult cattle is directly associated with geographic distribution patterns, when S and HE genes are taken into account. A less-resolved genealogy exists for the HE and N genes in cattle, with a trend for an age-related segregation pattern. The coronavirus strains from horses revealed Betacoronavirus sequences indistinguishable from those found in cattle, a fact previously unknown.