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The Scientific World Journal
Volume 2013, Article ID 350623, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/350623
Research Article

Cognitive Intraindividual Variability and White Matter Integrity in Aging

1FPSE, University of Geneva, Boul du Pont d’Arve 40, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland
2Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, 339 Windermere Road, London, ON, Canada N6A 5A5
3Electrical and Computer Engineering, Western University, 1151 Richmond Street, London, ON, Canada N6A 3K7
4CIGEV, University of Geneva, Boul du Pont d’Arve 40, 1211 Geneva 4, Switzerland

Received 24 May 2013; Accepted 3 July 2013

Academic Editors: A. Bayer, D. Dykiert, J. Kremláček, P. McLaughlin, and A. Tales

Copyright © 2013 Nathalie Mella et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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